Ryan Carroll

S1 E1 Working for your voice

5 min video | 4 min read

There are numerous opportunities for students to say what they feel around campus, and I am grateful that I have found my place to be heard.

Ryan Carroll, International Studies and Spanish majors, Class of 2018

What I appreciate about VCU is the diverse community and VCU's effort, alongside the student body, to unite the entire campus. This includes different programs and events, both university and student lead, that are inclusive and welcoming to all who want to participate. With this, new students, students of different backgrounds, returning students, and even staff and faculty are able to feel truly at home.

 

My involvement with VCU Student Affairs began when I started working in the VCU Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity as a student worker. While working there, I interacted daily with a diverse array of students. As my role in the office progressed, I began sitting in on hearings. Hearings are comprised of both faculty/staff and students. In these hearings, I was able to express my opinion as a student in order to prevent a sometimes biased decision. I developed a passion for serving on the hearings, so when I was appointed as Chair for Honor Councils, I was excited that my involvement in the adjudication process would continue.

 

My favorite part of being involved with VCU Student Affairs is that I am able to express my voice as a student. At VCU, voicing your opinion is something that the university highly encourages. Though there are many outspoken groups and organizations on campus, some students have a difficult time getting their voices heard. There are numerous opportunities for students to say what they feel around campus, and I am I grateful that I have found my place to be heard.

 

Through my involvement I have learned what it means for all students, and people, to be treated equally and fairly. While working in the office and serving on hearings, I interacted with a diverse group of students, from international to local. It is my office's mission to not only ensure their process went smoothly, but to make sure they were all being treated equally and no one student was better than the other. This often eased the anxiety and fear that students faced coming into our office.

 

When I graduate, I plan on attending law school. Working with Student Affairs has definitely influenced my decision to do this. Participating in the adjudication process sparked my curiosity for how different systems operate. I began contacting different lawyers, including a university lawyer. After this, I was sure that this is what I wanted to do with my life. I'm currently interning at the General Assembly and I hope to gain more experience with law afterwards. Student Affairs has greatly impacted my time so far at VCU and more importantly my life.